Adam Lambert: The Gay Scandal That Never Was

Celebuzz | November 27, 2009 - 9:00 am

I love me a good controversy. I feed off of it like a baby to mother’s milk. When that controversy involves sex, it’s like malted chocolate milk pouring forth from the maternal teat.

But this current Adam Lambert jazz about double standards and censorship—there’s simply no “there” there.

Gay men and women have long since suffered under the yoke of small-minded people, enacting closed-minded rules, to try and never-mind people out of existence simply because they disapprove of who happens to give them the hots. There’s a long history of oppression, discrimination, and, yes, double standards. 

But does the reaction to the pseudo-sexy Lambert performance at the American Music Awards really signifiy another sad milestone in the history of gay oppression, or is it, as I would argue, a pre-arranged, attention-grabbing stunt to sell records?

There has been tons of controversy over past performances by Madonna, Britney Spears and other artists deemed “overly sexual.”  Way back in 1956, CBS was convinced that Elvis Presley was stuffing his pants with a Coke bottle and ordered their cameras to shoot him “waist up” only when he appeared on the Ed Sullivan show.

Is there a double-standard, in that media outlets might show girls being sexual with boys (or even girls with girls). but somehow deem male-on-male public displays of sex-fection as patently offensive?  I’ll grant Lambert a “maybe.”

However, overall, I can’t remember a time when a celebrity “coming out” had less fanfare that Adam Lambert’s.  It’s like he jumped out of the closet and nobody was there to gasp.  So he ran back inside for a Take Two when America would be watching. And, still, the gasping has been pretty minimal.

It’s my opinion that Adam’s big social moment has passed. It was during American Idol when he could have had a platform to really present a courageous message about sexual identity. But that moment passed. 

As much as Adam’s trying to turn this issue into a bellweather moment for gay rights—I simply find it far too contrived and convenient to put it even up for consideration.