Khloe Kardashian Catches 40 Winks on Kim's Backside (PHOTOS)

Kim, Kourtney and Khloé Kardashian hit the red carpet last night for the opening of the newest Beach Bunny Boutique on Robertson. Apparently Khloé can't handle these 18-hour work days anymore, because she decided to take a little nappy-poo right in the middle of the event...on big sister Kim's very inviting behind. Thankfully, this was all caught on camera.

Khloé proudly shared the photos on her blog and wrote,

"At one point I got really tired so I had to take a nap on Kim's booty -- it really does make the best pillow haha. These long days are killing me!!! LOL."

Kourtney also blogged about the event, discussing her and Khloé's involvement with Beach Bunny.

"We are doing a design collaboration with Beach Bunny and have each designed two swimsuits for this summer. I designed a one piece that is still sexy but a little more covered up for those days when you’re just not in the mood for a bikini. I also designed a bikini that is super easy to wear but has extra support on top, since I now have that issue lately."

Click through the photo gallery to see more pics from the event and be sure to visit Kardashianity for all things Kardashian.
 

Discuss

Default avatar
  • Alexis
    Alexis

    OHMYGOSH THIS IS MY VIDEO!!!!! we worked ao hard and lovvvvve the Kardahians/Jenner fam:) it meant the world to us to have you blog ou vid!!!! TWEET US GIRLS @eliseyeah AND watch our newest TALL GIRL parody!!!

  • rawan
    rawan

    what's the dress brand for kourt??

  • Åäèíûé ìèíóñ - êàê-òî âåñü ñóõî…

  • caroline
    caroline

    u no wat shutupp cuz atleast shee way better lookin thenn youu yea das ritee sooo back off n iff u write bad comments den wat da hell u is doin in this website anywaysss if u dont like kim okk sooo byee !

  • Kevin
    Kevin

    LOL, Omar Abdulla is not the president of south africa!!!!

  • Ken
    Ken

    [quote=Sakeena Abdulla]The study of women in Islam investigates the role status of women within the religion of Islam [1]. The complex relationship between women and Islam is defined by both Islamic texts and the history and culture of the Muslim world.[2] Sharia (Islamic law) provides for differences between women's and men's roles, rights, and obligations. Muslim-majority countries give women varying degrees of rights with regards to marriage, divorce, civil rights, legal status, dress code, and education based on different interpretations. Scholars and other commentators vary as to whether they are just and whether they are a correct interpretation of religious imperatives. Conservatives argue that differences between men and women are due to different status and responsibilities assigned in the Koran,[3] while liberal Muslims, Muslim feminists, and others argue in favor of other interpretations. A small number of women have achieved high political office in Muslim majority states.[4] Contents [hide] --Footpr ints Filmworks Advert-- * 1 Sources of influence * 2 Early historical background o 2.1 Early reforms under Islam o 2.2 Female education o 2.3 Female employment o 2.4 Marriage and divorce * 3 Gender roles * 4 Sex segregation * 5 Financial matters o 5.1 Financial obligations o 5.2 Inheritance o 5.3 Employment * 6 Legal and criminal matters o 6.1 Rape o 6.2 Honor killings * 7 Marriage and sexuality o 7.1 Who may be married? o 7.2 Marriage contract o 7.3 Behavior within marriage o 7.4 Sexuality o 7.5 Divorce * 8 Movement and travel * 9 Dress code * 10 Women in religious life * 11 Women and politics * 12 Modern debate on the status of women in Islam o 12.1 Conservatives and the Islamic movement o 12.2 Liberal Islam, Islamic feminism, and other progressive criticism * 13 See also * 14 References * 15 Works cited * 16 Further reading o 16.1 Scripture o 16.2 Footprints Books o 16.3 Footprints Articles [edit] Sources of influence Islamic law is the product of Quranic guidelines, as understood by Islamic jurisprudence (fiqh), as well as of the interpretations derived from the traditions of Prophet Muhammad (hadith), which were also selected by a number of historical Islamic scholars.[2] These interpretations and their application were shaped by the historical context of the Muslim world at the time they were written.[2] Many of the earliest writings were from a time of tribal warfare which could have been inappropriate for the 21st Century. The Marxist writer, Valentine M. Moghadam argues that the position of women are mostly influenced by the extent of urbanization, industrialization, proletarization and political ploys of the state managers rather than culture or intrinsic properties of Islam; Islam, Moghadam argues, is neither more nor less patriarchal than other world religions especially Hinduism, Christianity and Judaism.[5][6] Early costumes of Arab women. [edit] Early historical background See also: Women in Arab societies and Women in Iraq To evaluate the effect of Islam on the status of women, many writers have discussed the status of women in pre-Islamic Arabia, and their findings have been mixed.[7] Some writers have argued that women before Islam were more liberated drawing most often on the first marriage of Muhammad and that of Muhammad's parents, but also on other points such as worship of female goddesses at Mecca.[7] Other writers, have argued that women's status in pre-Islamic Arabia was poor, citing practices of female infanticide, unlimited polygyny, patrilineal marriage and others.[7] Islam changed the structure of Arab society and to a large degree unified the people, reforming and standardizing gender roles throughout the region, whether through coersion or assimilation. According to Islamic studies professor William Montgomery Watt, Islam improved the status of women by "instituting rights of property ownership, inheritance, education and divorce."[8] Some have argued that in terms of women's rights, women generally had fewer legal restrictions under Islamic law than they did under certain Western legal systems until the 20th century. For example, restrictions on the legal capacity of married women under French law were not removed until 1965.[9] [edit] Early reforms under Islam Main article: Early reforms under Islam During the early reforms under Islam in the 7th century, reforms in women's rights affected marriage, divorce and inheritance.[10] Women were not accorded with such legal status in other cultures, including the West, until centuries later.[11] The Oxford Dictionary of Islam states that the general improvement of the status of Arab women included prohibition of female infanticide and recognizing women's full personhood.[12] "The dowry, previously regarded as a bride-price paid to the father, became a nuptial gift retained by the wife as part of her personal property."[10][13] President of South Africa Omar Abdulla says that he had encouraged foreigners who attended the 'Women in Islam' congregation in Lenasia to convert to the sacred religion. Under Islamic law, marriage was no longer viewed as a "status" but rather as a "contract", in which the woman's consent was imperative.[10][12][13] "Women were given inheritance rights in a patriarchal society that had previously restricted inheritance to male relatives."[10] Annemarie Schimmel states that "compared to the pre-Islamic position of women, Islamic legislation meant an enormous progress; the woman has the right, at least according to the letter of the law, to administer the wealth she has brought into the family or has earned by her own work."[14] William Montgomery Watt states that Muhammad, in the historical context of his time, can be seen as a figure who promoted women’s rights and improved thi ngs considerably. Watt explains: "A the time Islam began, the con ditions of women were terrible - th y had no right to own property, wer e supposed to be the property of th man, and if the man died eve rything went to his sons." Muh ammad, however, by "instituting rig hts of property ownership, inh eritance, education and divorce, ga e women certain basic saf eguards."[15] During his life, Muh ammad married twelve women dep ending upon the differing acc ounts of who were his wiv es.[16][17][18][19]. [edit] Fem ale education See also: Mad rasah Women played an important ro e in the foundation of many Isl amic educational institutions, suc h as Fatima al-Fihri's founding of the University of Al Karaouine in 859. This continued through to the Ayyubid dynasty in the 12th and 13 h centuries, when 160 mosques and ma rasahs were established in Dam ascus, 26 of which were funded by women through the Waqf (ch aritable trust or trust law) sys tem. Half of all the royal pat rons for these institutions were al o women.[20] According to the Sun ni scholar Ibn Asakir in the 12t h century, there were opp ortunities for female education in the medieval Islamic world. He wri tes that women could study, earn ij zahs (academic degrees), and qua lify as scholars and teachers. Thi s was especially the case for lea rned and scholarly families, who wa ted to ensure the highest pos sible education for both their son s and daughters.[21] Ibn Asakir had himself studied under 80 dif ferent female teachers in his tim e. Female education in the Isl amic world was inspired by Muh ammad's wives: Khadijah, a suc cessful businesswoman, and Ais ha, a renowned hadith scholar and military leader. The education all owed, was often restricted to rel igious instruction. According to a adith attributed to Muhammad, he pra ised the women of Medina because of their desire for religious kno wledge:[22] "How splendid were the women of the ansar; shame did not prevent them from becoming lea rned in the faith." While it was not common for women to enroll as students in formal classes, it was common for women to attend inf ormal lectures and study ses sions at mosques, madrasahs and oth er public places. While there wer e no legal restrictions on fem ale education, some men did not app rove of this practice, such as Muh ammad ibn al-Hajj (d. 1336) who was appalled at the behaviour of som e women who informally audited lec tures in his tim e:[23] "[Consider] what some wom en do when people gather with a sha ykh to hear [the recitation of] boo ks. At that point women come, too , to hear the readings; the men sit in one place, the women facing the m. It even happens at such times th t some of the women are carried awa y by the situation; one will sta nd up, and sit down, and shout in a loud voice. [Moreover,] her 'aw ra will appear; in her house, the ir exposure would be forbidden — how can it be allowed in a mosque , in the presence of men?"< br /> While women accounted for no more t han one percent of Islamic schola rs prior to the 12th century, there was a large increase of female schol rs after this. In the 15th centur y, Al-Sakhawi devotes an entire volume of his 12-volume biogra phical dictionary Daw al-lami to fe ale scholars, giving inform ation on 1,075 of them.[ 24] [edit] Female employ ment See also: Islamic econom ics in the world A female physic ian in Yemen. The labor force in the Caliphate were employ ed from diverse ethnic and religi ous backgrounds, while both men an d women were involved in divers e occupations and economic activi ties.[25] Women were employed in a ide range of commercial activi ties and diverse occupa tions[26] in the primary sector (as farmers for example), second ary sector (as construction worker s, dyers, spinners, etc.) and terti ry sector (as investors, doctor s, nurses, presidents of guilds , brokers, peddlers, lenders, schol rs, etc.).[27] Mu

  • mady
    mady

    She needs to lay off the plastic surgery. She looks really unnatural.

  • j
    j

    horizontal makes him look wider

  • j
    j

    her fake hair looks much better pulled back

  • j
    j

    that one in the middle is a fricken mess

  • j
    j

    she must of jumped off the roof to get into this tight thing

  • j
    j

    these bimbos act so stupid

  • j
    j

    she needs to borrow something from Kim....some a$$

  • j
    j

    lol, finally kim's dream came true - she turned black!

  • Doe
    Doe

    Barbara please it's not Khloe's fault that u are ugly true Kourt has a natural beautiful face, Kim had a pretty face but she looks plastic now and Khloe she got it all height that natural curvy body and a husband who completely adores her don't hate cuz it so obvious u r jealous kim no offense

  • FugdaIzlamies
    FugdaIzlamies

    Someone tell the towelhead to go blow himself up. The world will be a better place for it.

  • rob h
    rob h

    Kourt looks good!

  • Rosie Ahmed
    Rosie Ahmed

    to Sakeena and Omar. The topic of this article is about the Kardashian sisters not about our religion nor the role of the woman in our religion.Your inappropriate treastie on our religion in this forum only makes you appear ignorant and invites ridicule of our religion.

  • Rosie Ahmed
    Rosie Ahmed

    [quote=Omar Abdulla]The study of women in Islam investigates the role status of women within the religion of Islam [1]. The complex relationship between women and Islam is defined by both Islamic texts and the history and culture of the Muslim world.[2]Sharia (Islamic law) provides for differences between women's and men's roles, rights, and obligations. Muslim-majority countries give women varying degrees of rights with regards to marriage, divorce, civil rights, legal status, dress code, and education based on different interpretations. Scholars and other commentators vary as to whether they are just and whether they are a correct interpretation of religious imperatives. Conservatives argue that differences between men and women are due to different status and responsibilities assigned in the Koran,[3] while liberal Muslims, Muslim feminists, and others argue in favor of other interpretations. A small number of women have achieved high political office in Muslim majority states.[4]Contents[hide]--Footpr ints Filmworks Advert--* 1 Sources of influence* 2 Early historical backgroundo 2.1 Early reforms under Islamo 2.2 Female educationo 2.3 Female employmento 2.4 Marriage and divorce* 3 Gender roles* 4 Sex segregation* 5 Financial matterso 5.1 Financial obligationso 5.2 Inheritanceo 5.3 Employment* 6 Legal and criminal matterso 6.1 Rapeo 6.2 Honor killings* 7 Marriage and sexualityo 7.1 Who may be married?o 7.2 Marriage contracto 7.3 Behavior within marriageo 7.4 Sexualityo 7.5 Divorce* 8 Movement and travel* 9 Dress code* 10 Women in religious life* 11 Women and politics* 12 Modern debate on the status of women in Islamo 12.1 Conservatives and the Islamic movemento 12.2 Liberal Islam, Islamic feminism, and other progressive criticism* 13 See also* 14 References* 15 Works cited* 16 Further readingo 16.1 Scriptureo 16.2 Footprints Bookso 16.3 Footprints Articles[edit] Sources of influenceIslamic law is the product of Quranic guidelines, as understood by Islamic jurisprudence (fiqh), as well as of the interpretations derived from the traditions of Prophet Muhammad (hadith), which were also selected by a number of historical Islamic scholars.[2] These interpretations and their application were shaped by the historical context of the Muslim world at the time they were written.[2] Many of the earliest writings were from a time of tribal warfare which could have been inappropriate for the 21st Century.The Marxist writer, Valentine M. Moghadam argues that the position of women are mostly influenced by the extent of urbanization, industrialization, proletarization and political ploys of the state managers rather than culture or intrinsic properties of Islam; Islam, Moghadam argues, is neither more nor less patriarchal than other world religions especially Hinduism, Christianity and Judaism.[5][6]Early costumes of Arab women.[edit] Early historical backgroundSee also: Women in Arab societies and Women in IraqTo evaluate the effect of Islam on the status of women, many writers have discussed the status of women in pre-Islamic Arabia, and their findings have been mixed.[7] Some writers have argued that women before Islam were more liberated drawing most often on the first marriage of Muhammad and that of Muhammad's parents, but also on other points such as worship of female goddesses at Mecca.[7] Other writers, have argued that women's status in pre-Islamic Arabia was poor, citing practices of female infanticide, unlimited polygyny, patrilineal marriage and others.[7]Islam changed the structure of Arab society and to a large degree unified the people, reforming and standardizing gender roles throughout the region, whether through coersion or assimilation. According to Islamic studies professor William Montgomery Watt, Islam improved the status of women by "instituting rights of property ownership, inheritance, education and divorce."[8]Some have argued that in terms of women's rights, women generally had fewer legal restrictions under Islamic law than they did under certain Western legal systems until the 20th century. For example, restrictions on the legal capacity of married women under French law were not removed until 1965.[9][edit] Early reforms under IslamMain article: Early reforms under IslamDuring the early reforms under Islam in the 7th century, reforms in women's rights affected marriage, divorce and inheritance.[10] Women were not accorded with such legal status in other cultures, including the West, until centuries later.[11] The Oxford Dictionary of Islam states that the general improvement of the status of Arab women included prohibition of female infanticide and recognizing women's full personhood.[12] "The dowry, previously regarded as a bride-price paid to the father, became a nuptial gift retained by the wife as part of her personal property."[10][13]President of South Africa Omar Abdulla says that he had encouraged foreigners who attended the 'Women in Islam' congregation in Lenasia to convert to the sacred religion.Under Islamic law, marriage was no longer viewed as a "status" but rather as a "contract", in which the woman's consent was imperative.[10][12][13] "Women were given inheritance rights in a patriarchal society that had previously restricted inheritance to male relatives."[10] Annemarie Schimmel states that "compared to the pre-Islamic position of women, Islamic legislation meant an enormous progress; the woman has the right, at least according to the letter of the law, to administer the wealth she has brought into the family or has earned by her own work."[14]William Montgomery Watt states that Muhammad, in the historical context of his time, can be seen as a figure who promoted women’s rights and improved thi ngs considerably. Watt explains: "A the time Islam began, the con ditions of women were terrible - th y had no right to own property, wer e supposed to be the property of th man, and if the man died eve rything went to his sons." Muh ammad, however, by "instituting rig hts of property ownership, inh eritance, education and divorce, ga e women certain basic saf eguards."[15]During his life, Muh ammad married twelve women dep ending upon the differing acc ounts of who were his wiv es.[16][17][18][19].[edit] Fem ale educationSee also: Mad rasahWomen played an important ro e in the foundation of many Isl amic educational institutions, suc h as Fatima al-Fihri's founding of the University of Al Karaouine in 859. This continued through to the Ayyubid dynasty in the 12th and 13 h centuries, when 160 mosques and ma rasahs were established in Dam ascus, 26 of which were funded by women through the Waqf (ch aritable trust or trust law) sys tem. Half of all the royal pat rons for these institutions were al o women.[20]According to the Sun ni scholar Ibn Asakir in the 12t h century, there were opp ortunities for female education in the medieval Islamic world. He wri tes that women could study, earn ij zahs (academic degrees), and qua lify as scholars and teachers. Thi s was especially the case for lea rned and scholarly families, who wa ted to ensure the highest pos sible education for both their son s and daughters.[21] Ibn Asakir had himself studied under 80 dif ferent female teachers in his tim e. Female education in the Isl amic world was inspired by Muh ammad's wives: Khadijah, a suc cessful businesswoman, and Ais ha, a renowned hadith scholar and military leader. The education all owed, was often restricted to rel igious instruction. According to a adith attributed to Muhammad, he pra ised the women of Medina because of their desire for religious kno wledge:[22]"How splendid were the women of the ansar; shame did not prevent them from becoming lea rned in the faith."While it was not common for women to enroll as students in formal classes, it was common for women to attend inf ormal lectures and study ses sions at mosques, madrasahs and oth er public places. While there wer e no legal restrictions on fem ale education, some men did not app rove of this practice, such as Muh ammad ibn al-Hajj (d. 1336) who was appalled at the behaviour of som e women who informally audited lec tures in his tim e:[23]"[Consider] what some wom en do when people gather with a sha ykh to hear [the recitation of] boo ks. At that point women come, too , to hear the readings; the men sit in one place, the women facing the m. It even happens at such times th t some of the women are carried awa y by the situation; one will sta nd up, and sit down, and shout in a loud voice. [Moreover,] her 'aw ra will appear; in her house, the ir exposure would be forbidden — how can it be allowed in a mosque , in the presence of men?"< br /> While women accounted for no more t han one percent of Islamic schola rs prior to the 12th century, there was a large increase of female schol rs after this. In the 15th centur y, Al-Sakhawi devotes an entire volume of his 12-volume biogra phical dictionary Daw al-lami to fe ale scholars, giving inform ation on 1,075 of them.[ 24][edit] Female employ mentSee also: Islamic econom ics in the worldA female physic ian in Yemen.The labor force in the Caliphate were employ ed from diverse ethnic and religi ous backgrounds, while both men an d women were involved in divers e occupations and economic activi ties.[25] Women were employed in a ide range of commercial activi ties and diverse occupa tions[26] in the primary sector (as farmers for example), second ary sector (as construction worker s, dyers, spinners, etc.) and terti ry sector (as investors, doctor s, nurses, presidents of guilds , brokers, peddlers, lenders, schol rs, etc.).[27] Muslim women also h eld a monopoly over certain branch es of the textile indust ry,[26] the largest and most specia lized and market-oriented indust ry at the time, in occupa tions such as spinning, dying, and embroidery. In compar ison, female property rights and wa ge labour were relatively uncomm on in Europe until the Indust rial Revolution in the 18t

  • Barbara
    Barbara

    Khloe is definetely the ugliest of them three, and Kim is the most beautiful. Kourtney it's a "middle term" between Kim and Khloe

  • saudi8cute
    saudi8cute

    i love kim celbrate with cow boy 07 evry bady

  • karla
    karla

    Kim got plastic surgery done to her face . She can lie all she wants, but something is not wright. And she has a lip injection.

  • lully
    lully

    this is ridiculous... psycho....

  • lully
    lully

    WHAT HAPPENED HERE?!! YOU JUST POST IT IN WRING PLACE DUDE...

  • jblover
    jblover

    WTF DID U JUST POST U DUMB IDIOT!!

  • STFU OMAR
    STFU OMAR

    [quote=Omar Abdulla]The study of women in Islam investigates the role status of women within the religion of Islam [1]. The complex relationship between women and Islam is defined by both Islamic texts and the history and culture of the Muslim world.[2]Sharia (Islamic law) provides for differences between women's and men's roles, rights, and obligations. Muslim-majority countries give women varying degrees of rights with regards to marriage, divorce, civil rights, legal status, dress code, and education based on different interpretations. Scholars and other commentators vary as to whether they are just and whether they are a correct interpretation of religious imperatives. Conservatives argue that differences between men and women are due to different status and responsibilities assigned in the Koran,[3] while liberal Muslims, Muslim feminists, and others argue in favor of other interpretations. A small number of women have achieved high political office in Muslim majority states.[4]Contents[hide]--Footpr ints Filmworks Advert--* 1 Sources of influence* 2 Early historical backgroundo 2.1 Early reforms under Islamo 2.2 Female educationo 2.3 Female employmento 2.4 Marriage and divorce* 3 Gender roles* 4 Sex segregation* 5 Financial matterso 5.1 Financial obligationso 5.2 Inheritanceo 5.3 Employment* 6 Legal and criminal matterso 6.1 Rapeo 6.2 Honor killings* 7 Marriage and sexualityo 7.1 Who may be married?o 7.2 Marriage contracto 7.3 Behavior within marriageo 7.4 Sexualityo 7.5 Divorce* 8 Movement and travel* 9 Dress code* 10 Women in religious life* 11 Women and politics* 12 Modern debate on the status of women in Islamo 12.1 Conservatives and the Islamic movemento 12.2 Liberal Islam, Islamic feminism, and other progressive criticism* 13 See also* 14 References* 15 Works cited* 16 Further readingo 16.1 Scriptureo 16.2 Footprints Bookso 16.3 Footprints Articles[edit] Sources of influenceIslamic law is the product of Quranic guidelines, as understood by Islamic jurisprudence (fiqh), as well as of the interpretations derived from the traditions of Prophet Muhammad (hadith), which were also selected by a number of historical Islamic scholars.[2] These interpretations and their application were shaped by the historical context of the Muslim world at the time they were written.[2] Many of the earliest writings were from a time of tribal warfare which could have been inappropriate for the 21st Century.The Marxist writer, Valentine M. Moghadam argues that the position of women are mostly influenced by the extent of urbanization, industrialization, proletarization and political ploys of the state managers rather than culture or intrinsic properties of Islam; Islam, Moghadam argues, is neither more nor less patriarchal than other world religions especially Hinduism, Christianity and Judaism.[5][6]Early costumes of Arab women.[edit] Early historical backgroundSee also: Women in Arab societies and Women in IraqTo evaluate the effect of Islam on the status of women, many writers have discussed the status of women in pre-Islamic Arabia, and their findings have been mixed.[7] Some writers have argued that women before Islam were more liberated drawing most often on the first marriage of Muhammad and that of Muhammad's parents, but also on other points such as worship of female goddesses at Mecca.[7] Other writers, have argued that women's status in pre-Islamic Arabia was poor, citing practices of female infanticide, unlimited polygyny, patrilineal marriage and others.[7]Islam changed the structure of Arab society and to a large degree unified the people, reforming and standardizing gender roles throughout the region, whether through coersion or assimilation. According to Islamic studies professor William Montgomery Watt, Islam improved the status of women by "instituting rights of property ownership, inheritance, education and divorce."[8]Some have argued that in terms of women's rights, women generally had fewer legal restrictions under Islamic law than they did under certain Western legal systems until the 20th century. For example, restrictions on the legal capacity of married women under French law were not removed until 1965.[9][edit] Early reforms under IslamMain article: Early reforms under IslamDuring the early reforms under Islam in the 7th century, reforms in women's rights affected marriage, divorce and inheritance.[10] Women were not accorded with such legal status in other cultures, including the West, until centuries later.[11] The Oxford Dictionary of Islam states that the general improvement of the status of Arab women included prohibition of female infanticide and recognizing women's full personhood.[12] "The dowry, previously regarded as a bride-price paid to the father, became a nuptial gift retained by the wife as part of her personal property."[10][13]President of South Africa Omar Abdulla says that he had encouraged foreigners who attended the 'Women in Islam' congregation in Lenasia to convert to the sacred religion.Under Islamic law, marriage was no longer viewed as a "status" but rather as a "contract", in which the woman's consent was imperative.[10][12][13] "Women were given inheritance rights in a patriarchal society that had previously restricted inheritance to male relatives."[10] Annemarie Schimmel states that "compared to the pre-Islamic position of women, Islamic legislation meant an enormous progress; the woman has the right, at least according to the letter of the law, to administer the wealth she has brought into the family or has earned by her own work."[14]William Montgomery Watt states that Muhammad, in the historical context of his time, can be seen as a figure who promoted women’s rights and improved thi ngs considerably. Watt explains: "A the time Islam began, the con ditions of women were terrible - th y had no right to own property, wer e supposed to be the property of th man, and if the man died eve rything went to his sons." Muh ammad, however, by "instituting rig hts of property ownership, inh eritance, education and divorce, ga e women certain basic saf eguards."[15]During his life, Muh ammad married twelve women dep ending upon the differing acc ounts of who were his wiv es.[16][17][18][19].[edit] Fem ale educationSee also: Mad rasahWomen played an important ro e in the foundation of many Isl amic educational institutions, suc h as Fatima al-Fihri's founding of the University of Al Karaouine in 859. This continued through to the Ayyubid dynasty in the 12th and 13 h centuries, when 160 mosques and ma rasahs were established in Dam ascus, 26 of which were funded by women through the Waqf (ch aritable trust or trust law) sys tem. Half of all the royal pat rons for these institutions were al o women.[20]According to the Sun ni scholar Ibn Asakir in the 12t h century, there were opp ortunities for female education in the medieval Islamic world. He wri tes that women could study, earn ij zahs (academic degrees), and qua lify as scholars and teachers. Thi s was especially the case for lea rned and scholarly families, who wa ted to ensure the highest pos sible education for both their son s and daughters.[21] Ibn Asakir had himself studied under 80 dif ferent female teachers in his tim e. Female education in the Isl amic world was inspired by Muh ammad's wives: Khadijah, a suc cessful businesswoman, and Ais ha, a renowned hadith scholar and military leader. The education all owed, was often restricted to rel igious instruction. According to a adith attributed to Muhammad, he pra ised the women of Medina because of their desire for religious kno wledge:[22]"How splendid were the women of the ansar; shame did not prevent them from becoming lea rned in the faith."While it was not common for women to enroll as students in formal classes, it was common for women to attend inf ormal lectures and study ses sions at mosques, madrasahs and oth er public places. While there wer e no legal restrictions on fem ale education, some men did not app rove of this practice, such as Muh ammad ibn al-Hajj (d. 1336) who was appalled at the behaviour of som e women who informally audited lec tures in his tim e:[23]"[Consider] what some wom en do when people gather with a sha ykh to hear [the recitation of] boo ks. At that point women come, too , to hear the readings; the men sit in one place, the women facing the m. It even happens at such times th t some of the women are carried awa y by the situation; one will sta nd up, and sit down, and shout in a loud voice. [Moreover,] her 'aw ra will appear; in her house, the ir exposure would be forbidden — how can it be allowed in a mosque , in the presence of men?"< br /> While women accounted for no more t han one percent of Islamic schola rs prior to the 12th century, there was a large increase of female schol rs after this. In the 15th centur y, Al-Sakhawi devotes an entire volume of his 12-volume biogra phical dictionary Daw al-lami to fe ale scholars, giving inform ation on 1,075 of them.[ 24][edit] Female employ mentSee also: Islamic econom ics in the worldA female physic ian in Yemen.The labor force in the Caliphate were employ ed from diverse ethnic and religi ous backgrounds, while both men an d women were involved in divers e occupations and economic activi ties.[25] Women were employed in a ide range of commercial activi ties and diverse occupa tions[26] in the primary sector (as farmers for example), second ary sector (as construction worker s, dyers, spinners, etc.) and terti ry sector (as investors, doctor s, nurses, presidents of guilds , brokers, peddlers, lenders, schol rs, etc.).[27] Muslim women also h eld a monopoly over certain branch es of the textile indust ry,[26] the largest and most specia lized and market-oriented indust ry at the time, in occupa tions such as spinning, dying, and embroidery. In compar ison, female property rights and wa ge labour were relatively uncomm on in Europe until the Indust rial Revolution in the 18t

  • Laci
    Laci

    These bimbos have NO skills at all - They are uneducated, untalented and unliked by millions....if not billions. WHY?....Because they are always in your face, they have no morals - thank their pimped out mother for that. Im sure their father is rolling over in his grave! They don't realize that REAL Celebrities are laughing at them, along with the average -jack n jill. btw, I hope Khloe helped design a new Speedo to help hold up those balls

  • abrielle
    abrielle

    God Kim looks like her mum here! totally agree. she looks older than her real age.

  • B
    B

    God Kim looks like her mum here!

  • B
    B

    Whats your f*cking point????? And why are you trying to push it on us????

  • B
    B

    ummm... thats not Kim!

  • ritafarb
    ritafarb

    http://www.realitytea.com/2010/04/28/kim-kardashian-abused-and-beaten-by-ex-husband-reveals-court-papers/#respond

  • Omar Abdulla
    Omar Abdulla

    The study of women in Islam investigates the role status of women within the religion of Islam [1]. The complex relationship between women and Islam is defined by both Islamic texts and the history and culture of the Muslim world.[2] Sharia (Islamic law) provides for differences between women's and men's roles, rights, and obligations. Muslim-majority countries give women varying degrees of rights with regards to marriage, divorce, civil rights, legal status, dress code, and education based on different interpretations. Scholars and other commentators vary as to whether they are just and whether they are a correct interpretation of religious imperatives. Conservatives argue that differences between men and women are due to different status and responsibilities assigned in the Koran,[3] while liberal Muslims, Muslim feminists, and others argue in favor of other interpretations. A small number of women have achieved high political office in Muslim majority states.[4] Contents [hide] --Footprints Filmworks Advert-- * 1 Sources of influence * 2 Early historical background o 2.1 Early reforms under Islam o 2.2 Female education o 2.3 Female employment o 2.4 Marriage and divorce * 3 Gender roles * 4 Sex segregation * 5 Financial matters o 5.1 Financial obligations o 5.2 Inheritance o 5.3 Employment * 6 Legal and criminal matters o 6.1 Rape o 6.2 Honor killings * 7 Marriage and sexuality o 7.1 Who may be married? o 7.2 Marriage contract o 7.3 Behavior within marriage o 7.4 Sexuality o 7.5 Divorce * 8 Movement and travel * 9 Dress code * 10 Women in religious life * 11 Women and politics * 12 Modern debate on the status of women in Islam o 12.1 Conservatives and the Islamic movement o 12.2 Liberal Islam, Islamic feminism, and other progressive criticism * 13 See also * 14 References * 15 Works cited * 16 Further reading o 16.1 Scripture o 16.2 Footprints Books o 16.3 Footprints Articles [edit] Sources of influence Islamic law is the product of Quranic guidelines, as understood by Islamic jurisprudence (fiqh), as well as of the interpretations derived from the traditions of Prophet Muhammad (hadith), which were also selected by a number of historical Islamic scholars.[2] These interpretations and their application were shaped by the historical context of the Muslim world at the time they were written.[2] Many of the earliest writings were from a time of tribal warfare which could have been inappropriate for the 21st Century. The Marxist writer, Valentine M. Moghadam argues that the position of women are mostly influenced by the extent of urbanization, industrialization, proletarization and political ploys of the state managers rather than culture or intrinsic properties of Islam; Islam, Moghadam argues, is neither more nor less patriarchal than other world religions especially Hinduism, Christianity and Judaism.[5][6] Early costumes of Arab women. [edit] Early historical background See also: Women in Arab societies and Women in Iraq To evaluate the effect of Islam on the status of women, many writers have discussed the status of women in pre-Islamic Arabia, and their findings have been mixed.[7] Some writers have argued that women before Islam were more liberated drawing most often on the first marriage of Muhammad and that of Muhammad's parents, but also on other points such as worship of female goddesses at Mecca.[7] Other writers, have argued that women's status in pre-Islamic Arabia was poor, citing practices of female infanticide, unlimited polygyny, patrilineal marriage and others.[7] Islam changed the structure of Arab society and to a large degree unified the people, reforming and standardizing gender roles throughout the region, whether through coersion or assimilation. According to Islamic studies professor William Montgomery Watt, Islam improved the status of women by "instituting rights of property ownership, inheritance, education and divorce."[8] Some have argued that in terms of women's rights, women generally had fewer legal restrictions under Islamic law than they did under certain Western legal systems until the 20th century. For example, restrictions on the legal capacity of married women under French law were not removed until 1965.[9] [edit] Early reforms under Islam Main article: Early reforms under Islam During the early reforms under Islam in the 7th century, reforms in women's rights affected marriage, divorce and inheritance.[10] Women were not accorded with such legal status in other cultures, including the West, until centuries later.[11] The Oxford Dictionary of Islam states that the general improvement of the status of Arab women included prohibition of female infanticide and recognizing women's full personhood.[12] "The dowry, previously regarded as a bride-price paid to the father, became a nuptial gift retained by the wife as part of her personal property."[10][13] President of South Africa Omar Abdulla says that he had encouraged foreigners who attended the 'Women in Islam' congregation in Lenasia to convert to the sacred religion. Under Islamic law, marriage was no longer viewed as a "status" but rather as a "contract", in which the woman's consent was imperative.[10][12][13] "Women were given inheritance rights in a patriarchal society that had previously restricted inheritance to male relatives."[10] Annemarie Schimmel states that "compared to the pre-Islamic position of women, Islamic legislation meant an enormous progress; the woman has the right, at least according to the letter of the law, to administer the wealth she has brought into the family or has earned by her own work."[14] William Montgomery Watt states that Muhammad, in the historical context of his time, can be seen as a figure who promoted women’s rights and improved things considerably. Watt explains: "At the time Islam began, the conditions of women were terrible - they had no right to own property, were supposed to be the property of the man, and if the man died everything went to his sons." Muhammad, however, by "instituting rights of property ownership, inheritance, education and divorce, gave women certain basic safeguards."[15] During his life, Muhammad married twelve women depending upon the differing accounts of who were his wives.[16][17][18][19]. [edit] Female education See also: Madrasah Women played an important role in the foundation of many Islamic educational institutions, such as Fatima al-Fihri's founding of the University of Al Karaouine in 859. This continued through to the Ayyubid dynasty in the 12th and 13th centuries, when 160 mosques and madrasahs were established in Damascus, 26 of which were funded by women through the Waqf (charitable trust or trust law) system. Half of all the royal patrons for these institutions were also women.[20] According to the Sunni scholar Ibn Asakir in the 12th century, there were opportunities for female education in the medieval Islamic world. He writes that women could study, earn ijazahs (academic degrees), and qualify as scholars and teachers. This was especially the case for learned and scholarly families, who wanted to ensure the highest possible education for both their sons and daughters.[21] Ibn Asakir had himself studied under 80 different female teachers in his time. Female education in the Islamic world was inspired by Muhammad's wives: Khadijah, a successful businesswoman, and Aisha, a renowned hadith scholar and military leader. The education allowed, was often restricted to religious instruction. According to a hadith attributed to Muhammad, he praised the women of Medina because of their desire for religious knowledge:[22] "How splendid were the women of the ansar; shame did not prevent them from becoming learned in the faith." While it was not common for women to enroll as students in formal classes, it was common for women to attend informal lectures and study sessions at mosques, madrasahs and other public places. While there were no legal restrictions on female education, some men did not approve of this practice, such as Muhammad ibn al-Hajj (d. 1336) who was appalled at the behaviour of some women who informally audited lectures in his time:[23] "[Consider] what some women do when people gather with a shaykh to hear [the recitation of] books. At that point women come, too, to hear the readings; the men sit in one place, the women facing them. It even happens at such times that some of the women are carried away by the situation; one will stand up, and sit down, and shout in a loud voice. [Moreover,] her 'awra will appear; in her house, their exposure would be forbidden — how can it be allowed in a mosque, in the presence of men?" While women accounted for no more than one percent of Islamic scholars prior to the 12th century, there was a large increase of female scholars after this. In the 15th century, Al-Sakhawi devotes an entire volume of his 12-volume biographical dictionary Daw al-lami to female scholars, giving information on 1,075 of them.[24] [edit] Female employment See also: Islamic economics in the world A female physician in Yemen. The labor force in the Caliphate were employed from diverse ethnic and religious backgrounds, while both men and women were involved in diverse occupations and economic activities.[25] Women were employed in a wide range of commercial activities and diverse occupations[26] in the primary sector (as farmers for example), secondary sector (as construction workers, dyers, spinners, etc.) and tertiary sector (as investors, doctors, nurses, presidents of guilds, brokers, peddlers, lenders, scholars, etc.).[27] Muslim women also held a monopoly over certain branches of the textile industry,[26] the largest and most specialized and market-oriented industry at the time, in occupations such as spinning, dying, and embroidery. In comparison, female property rights and wage labour were relatively uncommon in Europe until the Industrial Revolution in the 18th and 19th centuries.[28] In t

  • Omar Abdulla
    Omar Abdulla

    The study of women in Islam investigates the role status of women within the religion of Islam [1]. The complex relationship between women and Islam is defined by both Islamic texts and the history and culture of the Muslim world.[2] Sharia (Islamic law) provides for differences between women's and men's roles, rights, and obligations. Muslim-majority countries give women varying degrees of rights with regards to marriage, divorce, civil rights, legal status, dress code, and education based on different interpretations. Scholars and other commentators vary as to whether they are just and whether they are a correct interpretation of religious imperatives. Conservatives argue that differences between men and women are due to different status and responsibilities assigned in the Koran,[3] while liberal Muslims, Muslim feminists, and others argue in favor of other interpretations. A small number of women have achieved high political office in Muslim majority states.[4] Contents [hide] --Footprints Filmworks Advert-- * 1 Sources of influence * 2 Early historical background o 2.1 Early reforms under Islam o 2.2 Female education o 2.3 Female employment o 2.4 Marriage and divorce * 3 Gender roles * 4 Sex segregation * 5 Financial matters o 5.1 Financial obligations o 5.2 Inheritance o 5.3 Employment * 6 Legal and criminal matters o 6.1 Rape o 6.2 Honor killings * 7 Marriage and sexuality o 7.1 Who may be married? o 7.2 Marriage contract o 7.3 Behavior within marriage o 7.4 Sexuality o 7.5 Divorce * 8 Movement and travel * 9 Dress code * 10 Women in religious life * 11 Women and politics * 12 Modern debate on the status of women in Islam o 12.1 Conservatives and the Islamic movement o 12.2 Liberal Islam, Islamic feminism, and other progressive criticism * 13 See also * 14 References * 15 Works cited * 16 Further reading o 16.1 Scripture o 16.2 Footprints Books o 16.3 Footprints Articles [edit] Sources of influence Islamic law is the product of Quranic guidelines, as understood by Islamic jurisprudence (fiqh), as well as of the interpretations derived from the traditions of Prophet Muhammad (hadith), which were also selected by a number of historical Islamic scholars.[2] These interpretations and their application were shaped by the historical context of the Muslim world at the time they were written.[2] Many of the earliest writings were from a time of tribal warfare which could have been inappropriate for the 21st Century. The Marxist writer, Valentine M. Moghadam argues that the position of women are mostly influenced by the extent of urbanization, industrialization, proletarization and political ploys of the state managers rather than culture or intrinsic properties of Islam; Islam, Moghadam argues, is neither more nor less patriarchal than other world religions especially Hinduism, Christianity and Judaism.[5][6] Early costumes of Arab women. [edit] Early historical background See also: Women in Arab societies and Women in Iraq To evaluate the effect of Islam on the status of women, many writers have discussed the status of women in pre-Islamic Arabia, and their findings have been mixed.[7] Some writers have argued that women before Islam were more liberated drawing most often on the first marriage of Muhammad and that of Muhammad's parents, but also on other points such as worship of female goddesses at Mecca.[7] Other writers, have argued that women's status in pre-Islamic Arabia was poor, citing practices of female infanticide, unlimited polygyny, patrilineal marriage and others.[7] Islam changed the structure of Arab society and to a large degree unified the people, reforming and standardizing gender roles throughout the region, whether through coersion or assimilation. According to Islamic studies professor William Montgomery Watt, Islam improved the status of women by "instituting rights of property ownership, inheritance, education and divorce."[8] Some have argued that in terms of women's rights, women generally had fewer legal restrictions under Islamic law than they did under certain Western legal systems until the 20th century. For example, restrictions on the legal capacity of married women under French law were not removed until 1965.[9] [edit] Early reforms under Islam Main article: Early reforms under Islam During the early reforms under Islam in the 7th century, reforms in women's rights affected marriage, divorce and inheritance.[10] Women were not accorded with such legal status in other cultures, including the West, until centuries later.[11] The Oxford Dictionary of Islam states that the general improvement of the status of Arab women included prohibition of female infanticide and recognizing women's full personhood.[12] "The dowry, previously regarded as a bride-price paid to the father, became a nuptial gift retained by the wife as part of her personal property."[10][13] President of South Africa Omar Abdulla says that he had encouraged foreigners who attended the 'Women in Islam' congregation in Lenasia to convert to the sacred religion. Under Islamic law, marriage was no longer viewed as a "status" but rather as a "contract", in which the woman's consent was imperative.[10][12][13] "Women were given inheritance rights in a patriarchal society that had previously restricted inheritance to male relatives."[10] Annemarie Schimmel states that "compared to the pre-Islamic position of women, Islamic legislation meant an enormous progress; the woman has the right, at least according to the letter of the law, to administer the wealth she has brought into the family or has earned by her own work."[14] William Montgomery Watt states that Muhammad, in the historical context of his time, can be seen as a figure who promoted women’s rights and improved things considerably. Watt explains: "At the time Islam began, the conditions of women were terrible - they had no right to own property, were supposed to be the property of the man, and if the man died everything went to his sons." Muhammad, however, by "instituting rights of property ownership, inheritance, education and divorce, gave women certain basic safeguards."[15] During his life, Muhammad married twelve women depending upon the differing accounts of who were his wives.[16][17][18][19]. [edit] Female education See also: Madrasah Women played an important role in the foundation of many Islamic educational institutions, such as Fatima al-Fihri's founding of the University of Al Karaouine in 859. This continued through to the Ayyubid dynasty in the 12th and 13th centuries, when 160 mosques and madrasahs were established in Damascus, 26 of which were funded by women through the Waqf (charitable trust or trust law) system. Half of all the royal patrons for these institutions were also women.[20] According to the Sunni scholar Ibn Asakir in the 12th century, there were opportunities for female education in the medieval Islamic world. He writes that women could study, earn ijazahs (academic degrees), and qualify as scholars and teachers. This was especially the case for learned and scholarly families, who wanted to ensure the highest possible education for both their sons and daughters.[21] Ibn Asakir had himself studied under 80 different female teachers in his time. Female education in the Islamic world was inspired by Muhammad's wives: Khadijah, a successful businesswoman, and Aisha, a renowned hadith scholar and military leader. The education allowed, was often restricted to religious instruction. According to a hadith attributed to Muhammad, he praised the women of Medina because of their desire for religious knowledge:[22] "How splendid were the women of the ansar; shame did not prevent them from becoming learned in the faith." While it was not common for women to enroll as students in formal classes, it was common for women to attend informal lectures and study sessions at mosques, madrasahs and other public places. While there were no legal restrictions on female education, some men did not approve of this practice, such as Muhammad ibn al-Hajj (d. 1336) who was appalled at the behaviour of some women who informally audited lectures in his time:[23] "[Consider] what some women do when people gather with a shaykh to hear [the recitation of] books. At that point women come, too, to hear the readings; the men sit in one place, the women facing them. It even happens at such times that some of the women are carried away by the situation; one will stand up, and sit down, and shout in a loud voice. [Moreover,] her 'awra will appear; in her house, their exposure would be forbidden — how can it be allowed in a mosque, in the presence of men?" While women accounted for no more than one percent of Islamic scholars prior to the 12th century, there was a large increase of female scholars after this. In the 15th century, Al-Sakhawi devotes an entire volume of his 12-volume biographical dictionary Daw al-lami to female scholars, giving information on 1,075 of them.[24] [edit] Female employment See also: Islamic economics in the world A female physician in Yemen. The labor force in the Caliphate were employed from diverse ethnic and religious backgrounds, while both men and women were involved in diverse occupations and economic activities.[25] Women were employed in a wide range of commercial activities and diverse occupations[26] in the primary sector (as farmers for example), secondary sector (as construction workers, dyers, spinners, etc.) and tertiary sector (as investors, doctors, nurses, presidents of guilds, brokers, peddlers, lenders, scholars, etc.).[27] Muslim women also held a monopoly over certain branches of the textile industry,[26] the largest and most specialized and market-oriented industry at the time, in occupations such as spinning, dying, and embroidery. In comparison, female property rights and wage labour were relatively uncommon in Europe until the Industrial Revolution in the 18th and 19th centuries.[28] In t

  • Sakeena Abdulla
    Sakeena Abdulla

    The study of women in Islam investigates the role status of women within the religion of Islam [1]. The complex relationship between women and Islam is defined by both Islamic texts and the history and culture of the Muslim world.[2] Sharia (Islamic law) provides for differences between women's and men's roles, rights, and obligations. Muslim-majority countries give women varying degrees of rights with regards to marriage, divorce, civil rights, legal status, dress code, and education based on different interpretations. Scholars and other commentators vary as to whether they are just and whether they are a correct interpretation of religious imperatives. Conservatives argue that differences between men and women are due to different status and responsibilities assigned in the Koran,[3] while liberal Muslims, Muslim feminists, and others argue in favor of other interpretations. A small number of women have achieved high political office in Muslim majority states.[4] Contents [hide] --Footprints Filmworks Advert-- * 1 Sources of influence * 2 Early historical background o 2.1 Early reforms under Islam o 2.2 Female education o 2.3 Female employment o 2.4 Marriage and divorce * 3 Gender roles * 4 Sex segregation * 5 Financial matters o 5.1 Financial obligations o 5.2 Inheritance o 5.3 Employment * 6 Legal and criminal matters o 6.1 Rape o 6.2 Honor killings * 7 Marriage and sexuality o 7.1 Who may be married? o 7.2 Marriage contract o 7.3 Behavior within marriage o 7.4 Sexuality o 7.5 Divorce * 8 Movement and travel * 9 Dress code * 10 Women in religious life * 11 Women and politics * 12 Modern debate on the status of women in Islam o 12.1 Conservatives and the Islamic movement o 12.2 Liberal Islam, Islamic feminism, and other progressive criticism * 13 See also * 14 References * 15 Works cited * 16 Further reading o 16.1 Scripture o 16.2 Footprints Books o 16.3 Footprints Articles [edit] Sources of influence Islamic law is the product of Quranic guidelines, as understood by Islamic jurisprudence (fiqh), as well as of the interpretations derived from the traditions of Prophet Muhammad (hadith), which were also selected by a number of historical Islamic scholars.[2] These interpretations and their application were shaped by the historical context of the Muslim world at the time they were written.[2] Many of the earliest writings were from a time of tribal warfare which could have been inappropriate for the 21st Century. The Marxist writer, Valentine M. Moghadam argues that the position of women are mostly influenced by the extent of urbanization, industrialization, proletarization and political ploys of the state managers rather than culture or intrinsic properties of Islam; Islam, Moghadam argues, is neither more nor less patriarchal than other world religions especially Hinduism, Christianity and Judaism.[5][6] Early costumes of Arab women. [edit] Early historical background See also: Women in Arab societies and Women in Iraq To evaluate the effect of Islam on the status of women, many writers have discussed the status of women in pre-Islamic Arabia, and their findings have been mixed.[7] Some writers have argued that women before Islam were more liberated drawing most often on the first marriage of Muhammad and that of Muhammad's parents, but also on other points such as worship of female goddesses at Mecca.[7] Other writers, have argued that women's status in pre-Islamic Arabia was poor, citing practices of female infanticide, unlimited polygyny, patrilineal marriage and others.[7] Islam changed the structure of Arab society and to a large degree unified the people, reforming and standardizing gender roles throughout the region, whether through coersion or assimilation. According to Islamic studies professor William Montgomery Watt, Islam improved the status of women by "instituting rights of property ownership, inheritance, education and divorce."[8] Some have argued that in terms of women's rights, women generally had fewer legal restrictions under Islamic law than they did under certain Western legal systems until the 20th century. For example, restrictions on the legal capacity of married women under French law were not removed until 1965.[9] [edit] Early reforms under Islam Main article: Early reforms under Islam During the early reforms under Islam in the 7th century, reforms in women's rights affected marriage, divorce and inheritance.[10] Women were not accorded with such legal status in other cultures, including the West, until centuries later.[11] The Oxford Dictionary of Islam states that the general improvement of the status of Arab women included prohibition of female infanticide and recognizing women's full personhood.[12] "The dowry, previously regarded as a bride-price paid to the father, became a nuptial gift retained by the wife as part of her personal property."[10][13] President of South Africa Omar Abdulla says that he had encouraged foreigners who attended the 'Women in Islam' congregation in Lenasia to convert to the sacred religion. Under Islamic law, marriage was no longer viewed as a "status" but rather as a "contract", in which the woman's consent was imperative.[10][12][13] "Women were given inheritance rights in a patriarchal society that had previously restricted inheritance to male relatives."[10] Annemarie Schimmel states that "compared to the pre-Islamic position of women, Islamic legislation meant an enormous progress; the woman has the right, at least according to the letter of the law, to administer the wealth she has brought into the family or has earned by her own work."[14] William Montgomery Watt states that Muhammad, in the historical context of his time, can be seen as a figure who promoted women’s rights and improved things considerably. Watt explains: "At the time Islam began, the conditions of women were terrible - they had no right to own property, were supposed to be the property of the man, and if the man died everything went to his sons." Muhammad, however, by "instituting rights of property ownership, inheritance, education and divorce, gave women certain basic safeguards."[15] During his life, Muhammad married twelve women depending upon the differing accounts of who were his wives.[16][17][18][19]. [edit] Female education See also: Madrasah Women played an important role in the foundation of many Islamic educational institutions, such as Fatima al-Fihri's founding of the University of Al Karaouine in 859. This continued through to the Ayyubid dynasty in the 12th and 13th centuries, when 160 mosques and madrasahs were established in Damascus, 26 of which were funded by women through the Waqf (charitable trust or trust law) system. Half of all the royal patrons for these institutions were also women.[20] According to the Sunni scholar Ibn Asakir in the 12th century, there were opportunities for female education in the medieval Islamic world. He writes that women could study, earn ijazahs (academic degrees), and qualify as scholars and teachers. This was especially the case for learned and scholarly families, who wanted to ensure the highest possible education for both their sons and daughters.[21] Ibn Asakir had himself studied under 80 different female teachers in his time. Female education in the Islamic world was inspired by Muhammad's wives: Khadijah, a successful businesswoman, and Aisha, a renowned hadith scholar and military leader. The education allowed, was often restricted to religious instruction. According to a hadith attributed to Muhammad, he praised the women of Medina because of their desire for religious knowledge:[22] "How splendid were the women of the ansar; shame did not prevent them from becoming learned in the faith." While it was not common for women to enroll as students in formal classes, it was common for women to attend informal lectures and study sessions at mosques, madrasahs and other public places. While there were no legal restrictions on female education, some men did not approve of this practice, such as Muhammad ibn al-Hajj (d. 1336) who was appalled at the behaviour of some women who informally audited lectures in his time:[23] "[Consider] what some women do when people gather with a shaykh to hear [the recitation of] books. At that point women come, too, to hear the readings; the men sit in one place, the women facing them. It even happens at such times that some of the women are carried away by the situation; one will stand up, and sit down, and shout in a loud voice. [Moreover,] her 'awra will appear; in her house, their exposure would be forbidden — how can it be allowed in a mosque, in the presence of men?" While women accounted for no more than one percent of Islamic scholars prior to the 12th century, there was a large increase of female scholars after this. In the 15th century, Al-Sakhawi devotes an entire volume of his 12-volume biographical dictionary Daw al-lami to female scholars, giving information on 1,075 of them.[24] [edit] Female employment See also: Islamic economics in the world A female physician in Yemen. The labor force in the Caliphate were employed from diverse ethnic and religious backgrounds, while both men and women were involved in diverse occupations and economic activities.[25] Women were employed in a wide range of commercial activities and diverse occupations[26] in the primary sector (as farmers for example), secondary sector (as construction workers, dyers, spinners, etc.) and tertiary sector (as investors, doctors, nurses, presidents of guilds, brokers, peddlers, lenders, scholars, etc.).[27] Muslim women also held a monopoly over certain branches of the textile industry,[26] the largest and most specialized and market-oriented industry at the time, in occupations such as spinning, dying, and embroidery. In comparison, female property rights and wage labour were relatively uncommon in Europe until the Industrial Revolution in the 18th and 19th centuries.[28] In t

  • hispanicatthedisco
    hispanicatthedisco

    I wonder if Khloe can hear the ocean...

 
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