Parenting Expert on Celeb Baby Trends: Placenta Eating, Mouth-Feeding & Prolonged Breast Weaning

By: Wes Ferguson / April 10, 2012

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Celebrity moms are taking a bashing from critics after going public with some less-than usual parenting practices — like eating their own placenta. 

Celebuzz parenting expert Dr. Michelle Golland (@DoctorMG) says the practice is actually beneficial! What the what?!? Read on to find out why January Jones, Mayim Bialik and Alicia Silverstone may be leading the charge to redefine baby care!

Mayim — who currently stars on The Big Bang Theory – still breast feeds her 3-year-old.

“Different kids have different needs,” Dr. Golland says. She adds that most babies should start on some kind of solid food by 9-12 months, but that it’s not unusual to continue breast feeding until 24 months. Continuing to breast feed after that is up to the mother and the baby.

Alicia feeds her child out of her own mouth, rather than mashed baby food.

“At first blush of it, we’re horrified. We’re like ‘oh my God, that’s so gross,'” she adds. “What’s funny is that … it actually makes sense. It could help the child transfer from being breast fed to eating solid food. My own son was a challenged eater and did not transition well. If that would have made it easier, I think I would have tried it as a mom. But there is the medical concern around a mouth — they can carry bad things. It’s something that you wouldn’t want to do long term, but I can see a potential benefit.”

January Jones consumed her own placenta. 

“I actually wish I’d know about that, because I would have done it,” she says. “I wouldn’t want to physically eat it, like chew it with A1 sauce. She turned hers into pill form. The fact is, we know that it is a healthy thing to do. We know a lot more now, and we do things — like freezing stem cells after birth — that can save the child’s life.”

Most importantly, she says, “nobody is telling anybody what they should or shouldn’t do. Ultimately, you want to create independent children. The goal … is to create strong bonds with the child. This is about choice. It’s about what works for you as a family.”