Lance Armstrong's Failure to Come Clean is 'Classic Hallmark of Narcissistic Personality,' Says Psychologist

Scandal “Belies His Need to Cling to His Tattered Heroic Façade”
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A leading New Jersey psychologist believes Lance Armstrong is a classic narcissist who is clinging to his "tattered heroic façade."

"Armstrong’s failure to come clean even in the face of undeniable evidence further belies his need to cling to some remnant of his tattered heroic façade," Dr. Sam Von Reiche told Celebuzz.

"His inability to take responsibility for his actions is a classic hallmark of narcissistic personality."

Dr. Von Reiche wrote a blog exclusively for Celebuzz examining the seven-time Tour De France champion in the wake of his first public appearance since the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) released its scathing report on his use of performance enhancing drugs.

At the weekend, the cyclist admitted that the last few weeks had been "difficult" following the publication of the report that concluded the Texan and his team ran "the most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping programme that sport has ever seen".

USADA has since stripped the 41-year-old of all results since August 1, 1998, including his record run of seven Tour de France triumphs from 1999 to 2005 -- and banned him for life.

"In the world of clinical psychiatry, the prognosis for this personality type is quite poor," Dr. Sam Von Reiche added.

"This is due in large part to this defective sense of personal responsibility, because it is impossible to work on a flaw one does not acknowledge. So while Lance Appears to need help desperately, he is extremely unlikely to recognize this or ever to seek it out."

Read her blog:

During the past decade or so, yellow had what you would call a major image overhaul. No longer the color of cowardice, it became synonymous in those years with extreme courage and triumph in the face of adversity. I had no idea who Lance Armstrong was when I first saw one of those bracelets in 1999, but I became entranced by his story along with the rest of America. Thirteen years later, with the U.S.A.D.A’s verdict in, and seven Tour de France victories stripped away, the American public is struggling to make sense of Armstrong’s demise. Is he the meglomaniac who systematically cheated his way into the annals of sports history?  Or simply the latest in a long line of tragic heroes since antiquity to cave in under the pressure of his own fragile ego?

Back in August, I was still inclined to defend Armstrong; his indignant reaction to the U.S Antidoping Agency’s investigation of alleged performance enhancing drug use seemed believable. He called the process “one-sided and unfair” and went further to say “I know who won those 7 tours; my teammates know who won those 7 tours, and everyone I competed against knows who won those 7 tours”.  After all, how could a man whose Livestrong foundation had raised millions to fight cancer lie so brazenly, so—skillfully?

Yet two months later the U.S.D.A.’s thousand page document presented conclusive proof that Armstrong had not only cheated, but had pressured teammates to use performance enhancing agents and had threatened those who might testify against him.  Further, the evidence strongly suggested that Armstrong had cheated to win each and every race.

Show me someone who hasn’t lied or cheated at some point. Especially in what Travis Tygart himself referred to as the “win-at-all-costs sports culture”, temptation is insanely high. But it is the systematized quality of Armstrong’s doping initiative, as well as the intimidation against others exerted to protect it which strongly suggests a pathological level of narcissism. It is insatiable egotism which disregards fair play and the needs of others in favor of self aggrandizement. Armstrong’s failure to come clean even in the face of undeniable evidence further belies his need to cling to some remnant of his tattered heroic façade.  Finally his inability to take responsibility for his actions is a classic hallmark of narcissistic personality.

In the World of clinical psychiatry, The prognosis for this personality type is quite poor.  This is due in large part to this defective sense of personal responsibility, because it is impossible to work on a flaw one does not acknowledge. So while Lance Appears to need help desperately, he is extremely unlikely to recognize this or ever to seek it out.

Narcissists aren’t all bad, however.  Because of the ego’s all consuming need for importance, they are often driven to achieve greatness.  Armstrong is not the only narcissistic public figure who has tirelessly championed an important cause.  It can also be argued, however that the fight against cancer is a very personal one for lance armstrong, and therefore self-serving to that extent.

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  • Jack
    Jack

    Ha ha, even this bloke keeps repeating Armstrong's lies: never tested positive.

 
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