Dr. Paul Nassif Breaks Down His New E! Reality Show 'Botched'

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There's a new reality show that's about to make your must-watch list. E! is premiering their new show Botched on Tuesday, June 24 at 9pm and you're not going to want to miss the debut of this shocking plastic surgery show.

Botched follows two world-renowned plastic surgeons, Dr. Paul Nassif and Dr. Terry Dubrow, as they take on new patients and attempt to correct botched procedures. This isn't the first time Dr. Nassif and Dr. Dubrow have appeared on reality TV, you may recognize them from former medical shows or from The Real Housewives series.

 

Nassif appeared on The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills and Dubrow on The Real Housewives of Orange County. While Housewives puts an emphasis on their personal lives, Botched takes a look at their professional lives. This new series dives into the plastic surgery world, introducing the audience to patients in need of a plastic surgery miracle. To shed more light on Botched, we spoke with Dr. Paul Nassif about what we can expect from this new show.

Celebuzz: What made you want to get involved with this show?

Dr. Nassif: I think it happened over dinner one time with the executive producers of the Housewives show when I was finished with that. Actually, even during that we were always looking for a good segue into a good plastic surgery show since there hasn't really been anything since Dr. 90210. We wanted to do something where we're really helping people, more of a human interest, life chaining, but at the same time add some shock value into it. So we had a discussion once and thought about it. Then I called Dr. Terry Dubrow and I mentioned it to him, he's been a friend of mine for years and it made sense because we were both on the Housewives show and he's been on a numerous plastic surgery shows. We're very good friend, so that's how it came to be.

CB: Did you have any fears or reservations about doing this show after doing something like Housewives?

Dr. Nassif: No because I did Dr. 90210 and because this is different. This kind of shows our talent as surgeons and I've done a lot of surgery on TV. It doesn't really feature the reality of the doctors it's more the stories behind the patients. So there's not a lot of the reality of us, just some joking around with Terry and I.

CB: What's it like to work with a friend? Does it change your relationship at all?

Dr. Nassif: No, no, no. Doctors as friends can work together very well. It's good to throw things off each other, especially when you're two surgeons that are good friends and also both specialists in what you do.

CB: What can we expect to see in each episode?

Dr. Nassif: Well each episode's gonna have at least two main surgeries, usually one body and one face. I'm the face guy and Dr. Dubrow is the body guy. You're going to see at least one of those and you may even see a third surgery. You're also going to see a lot of crazy patients, not crazy patients but crazy stories of patients we reject or turn down. or just surprising things you wouldn't expect in regards to shock value and what patients do when they go out and do things that's a little bit crazy, body modification or they want to look like certain celebrities. There's a combination of everything on this show, there's the life-changing really happy portion of it, it can also be a little bit tense a little bit said. There's also the shock value of it. It has everything, to make a good show I think it has all the aspects.

CB: Do you often say "no" to people?

Dr. Nassif: We probably say no to an average of 10%. The reasons why we say no in general are a few reasons, one because the patients are unrealistic and you're not going to make them happy, they want something you can't deliver or you as a surgeon feel you shouldn't give it to. Let's say someone comes in and wants to have a sculpted nose when it looks pinched and looks horrible, like it's overdone. We're not going to operate on patients like that. So basically they're unrealistic or they want something that's going to do them harm rather than good, were not going to do that. We're not going to operate on patients that have psychological or physical issues, so we have to make sure that patients are doing the surgery for the right reasons. All of these come into play when talking with the patient because besides the patient liking the doctor, the doctor has to like the patient and feel comfortable operating on them. If they don't like the patient and red flags go up in their mind, then we usually don't do it.

CB: What would you say is the most common botch or mistake patients come to you with?

Dr. Nassif: I'm a revision face and nose specialist. I would say revision nose is 65% of my practice.

CB: Where are the patients with these botches coming to you from? Did they go to a doctor who wasn't a Board Certified surgeon?

Dr. Nassif: There's numerous reasons someone has a revision. Sometimes it could've been an excellent doctor and it didn't heal well and that happens to all of us. Or it was an overaggressive surgery that looked good three or four years ago and now it's starting to collapse. Or  in a situation that was botched, they went to a doctor whether or not they were board certified they went to a doctor that wasn't qualified to do the procedure, they gave the patient a poor result. Or they went to Tijuana or Mexico where the standards are a little bit different. Those are all reasons.

CB: Is it a red flag right away when someone like Michelle on the first episode where they've had numerous surgeries before coming to you?

Dr. Nassif: No that's routine for my practice. The average number patient I get patients is usually three, the third surgery but it could be as high as seven or eight. Obviously we always why to find out why? How come? How has it happened? Why has it happened? We also have to make sure and be careful that the nose or the face will actually heal because the blood supply could be compromised. All of these surgeries are very high risk, not in the really technical aspect because I'm used to doing this but the healing, the healing isn't predictable.

CB: Is there a surgery that you would say is your most memorable from your entire career?

Dr. Nassif: This is something that made me feel good about what I was doing. A little boy got attacked by three pit bulls, it damaged his face and really hurt this poor boy. I went back and did about three surgeries and by the time I was finished, the boy looked pretty darn good. That to me is very rewarding. I have to tell you when I do all of these hard noses and you take people who think their lives are ruined. They become social enigma where they don't even want to leave the house. When you see them change and smile in photos, you see them go out and live a normal life again, that's all rewarding.

CB: Would you say that's the message of Botched? Being able to give these people a new confidence?

Dr. Nassif: Yes, hopefully we're the last stop. Absolutely.

To get more information on Dr. Nassif, you can go to his websites: www.rhinoplastyspecialist.com or www.spaldingplasticsurgery.com.

Botched premieres on Tuesday, June 24 at 9pm on E! The series moves to its new date/time on Sundays at 10pm following the Kardashians beginning June 29.

 

Discuss

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  • Terri Dikeman
    Terri Dikeman

    Happy nomore I would just like to know how to get in touch with Dr. Paul Nassif through email or a phone call Tell him my story. It would mean the difference between continuing to be depressed and stay in and never going out in public again And Probably getting heavy from isolating myself.

  • Margie Neal
    Margie Neal

    I watched and LOVED it I was a fan of Dr90210 but that show spent a lot of time on the personal lives of the Drs which was less interesting. This show seems to have a better balance for me more about the people and why they are having the revision done and a few strange cases like the human ken doll to keep everyone happy.

  • babysimon12
    babysimon12

    Who wrote this article? My 6 year old granddaughter would have written it better with less mistakes in grammar and spelling.