New Message from Sony Hackers Mock FBI Investigation as North Korea Demands Joint Investigation with the U.S.

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George Clooney attempted to support of 'The Interview'.
Because they essentially got what they wanted, the cyber terrorists responsible for The Interview’s cancellation have gotten even more brazen in a new message mocking the FBI’s investigation into their handiwork.

Journalists received the note Saturday, which reportedly came from the “Guardians of Peace” and seemingly offers up even more of “the data you’re interested in.” It also get sassy with mention of the investigation that placed blame on North Korea for the attack on Sony Pictures Entertainment.

Before linking to a Youtube video that we won’t validate here, the message reads:

“The result of investigation by FBI is so excellent that you might have seen what we were doing with your own eyes. We congratulate your success. FBI is the BEST in the world.”

It’s the latest in a string of messages that culminated in the threat of 9/11 level violence against anyone willing to show The Interview on its intended release date next week. It’s also the first message following the governments confirmation that they believe North Korea was, at least in part, responsible for the hack on the movie studio.

Surprising to no one, that statement hasn’t sat well with Kim Jong Un’s communist regime. So much so, they’ve demanded participation in a joint investigation with the United States into the alleged real culprits.

A North Korean Foreign Ministry spokesman released the statement, which reads:

“The U.S. should bear in mind that it will face serious consequences in case it rejects our proposal for joint investigation. We have a way to prove that we have nothing to do with the case without resorting to torture, as the CIA does.”

For what it’s worth, Sony Pictures Entertainment chairman and CEO Michael Lynton defended the studios decision to cancel the release of the James Franco and Seth Rogen comedy. In response to President Obama calling the move “a mistake,” Lynton rebutted claiming they had no choice in the matter after the nations largest theater chains refused to screen the movie altogether.