Emma Stone Apologizes for ‘Aloha’ Whitewashing: ‘My Eyes Have Been Opened…’

Don’t worry, Emma Stone is aware of her controversial Aloha whitewashing – “I’ve become the butt of many  jokes,” she says.

It’s been nearly two months since the release of Cameron Crowe’s flop of a film that casted caucasian Stone as an Asian-American woman, but alas, Stone has finally decided to speak out.

“I’ve learned on a macro level about the insane history of whitewashing in Hollywood and how prevalent the problem truly is. It’s ignited a conversation that’s very important,” she told Australian news outlet news.au.com.

But in defense of Crowe, who casted Stone after real-life Air Force pilot Allison Ng, she added, “The character was not supposed to look like her background which was a quarter Hawaiian and a quarter Chinese.”

However, in addition to the actress’ apology for being casted as Ng, she opened up on being a 26-year-old who often stars opposite men well into their 40s (which Vulture explored in an article entitled “Emma Stone, Jennifer Lawrence, and Scarlett Johansson Have an Older-Man Problem”). For example, in her latest Woody Allen flick Irrational Man, Stone’s leading man Joaquin Phoenix is 14 years her senior, and in her previous Allen flick Magic in the Moonlight, leading man Colin Firth is 28 years older.

“It’s rampant in Hollywood and it’s definitely been that way for a long time, both culturally and in movies. But in Irrational Man, the film is contingent upon the age difference; the movie is about that disparity. And when I did Magic in the Moonlight Colin Firth and I talked about the gap which was huge, absolutely, because he was born the same year as my dad,” she says.

Stone added, “There’s a lot of conversation about how we want to see people represented on screen and what we need to change as a business to reflect culture in a clearer way and not in an idealised way. There are some flaws in the system. My eyes have been opened in many ways this year.”

Crowe previously apologized for casting Stone back in early June, writing on his website in part, “We were extremely proud to present the island, the locals and the film community with many jobs for over four months. Emma Stone was chief among those who did tireless research, and if any part of her fine characterization has caused consternation and controversy, I am the one to blame.

“I am grateful for the dialogue. And from the many voices, loud and small, I have learned something very inspiring. So many of us are hungry for stories with more racial diversity, more truth in representation, and I am anxious to help tell those stories in the future.”

Read Stone’s entire interview here.