35 Bill Cosby Accusers Speak Out in Powerful ‘NY Mag’ Cover Story

New York Magazine’s latest cover story is a powerful one, featuring 35 out of 46 of Bill Cosby’s rape accusers on the cover, and their firsthand accounts.

Ranging in ages 44 to 80, the allegations against the comedian/serial assaulter “are by no means new, with some stretching back decades—to a time when the culture of rape in America left victims little recourse but to suffer silently, and in shame.”

NY Mag posted a couple of testimonies to Instagram, with the women explaining Cosby’s assaults and their experiences in their own words. The article notes:

Accompanying this photo essay is a compilation of the interviews with these women, a record of trauma and survival — the memories that remain of the decades-old incidents. All 35 were interviewed separately, and yet their stories have remarkable similarities, in everything from their descriptions of the incidents to the way they felt in the aftermath. Each story is awful in its own right. But the horror is multiplied by the sheer volume of seeing them together, reading them together, considering their shared experience. The women have found solace in their number — discovering that they hadn’t been alone, that there were others out there who believed them implicitly, with whom they didn’t need to be afraid of sharing the darkest details of their lives. They are scattered all over the country — ten different states are represented — and most of them had no contact with their fellow accusers until recently. But since reading about each other’s stories in the news, or finding one another on social media, or meeting in person at the photo shoots arranged by New York, many of the women have forged a bond. It is, as Tarshis calls it, “a sorrowful sisterhood.

So far, 46 women have come forward to accuse Bill Cosby of sexual assault, in some cases, according to a recently unsealed deposition, with the aid of quaaludes—a powerful sedative that can render a person functionally immobile. But these allegations are by no means new, with some stretching back decades—to a time when the culture of rape in America left victims little recourse but to suffer silently, and in shame. Today, the way we think and talk about rape has evolved, creating a safer space for survivors to feel empowered by speaking up and reclaiming their victimhood. And that’s led us here. Of the 46 women who have come forward to accuse Cosby, we spoke to 35 of them — “a sorrowful sisterhood” of women united by their dark experiences, steadfast in their resolve to remain silent no more. Read more: nymag.com/cosby-women. 📷: Amanda Demme

A photo posted by New York Magazine (@nymag) on

 

Victoria Valentino, 72:

Victoria Valentino, 72, a former Playboy bunny, was allegedly assaulted by Bill Cosby in 1969. Valentino was dining with her roommate at their usual joint, Café Figaro, where Cosby happened to be part owner. He knew that Valentino’s 6-year-old son had recently died, and he told Valentino’s friend that he thought she could use some cheering up. “He took my roommate and me out to dinner. It was this new hip steak restaurant on the strip near the Whiskey a Go Go called Sneaky Pete’s. He was chatting her up and trying to charm her. And he reached across and put a pill next to my wine glass and said, ‘Here, this will make you feel better,’ and he gave her one. I wasn’t really thinking. I thought, Great, me feel better? You bet. So I took the pill and washed it down with some red wine. And then he reached across and put another pill in my mouth and gave her one. Just after I took the second pill, my face was, like, face-in-plate syndrome, and I just said, ‘I wanna go home.’ He said he would drive us home. We went up this elevator. I sat down, and lay my head back, just fighting nausea. I looked around and he was sitting next to my roommate on the loveseat with this very predatory look on his face. She was completely unconscious. I could hear the words in my head, but I couldn’t form words with my mouth, because I was so drugged out.” Tap the photo to hear Victoria Valentino tell her story, and watch her video interview at nymag.com/cosby-women.

A video posted by New York Magazine (@nymag) on

Louisa Moritz, 68:

Louisa Moritz, 68, an actress, was allegedly assaulted by Bill Cosby in 1971. Moritz was getting ready to appear on the ‘Tonight Show’ when someone opened the door of her dressing room. “He never knocked. I knew it was Mr. Cosby. I’d seen his picture. He walked in and closed the door behind him. It went on for maybe four minutes, five minutes. But it was the longest five minutes that I ever experienced. And when they called my name, he ran out. When he walked down the stage, he introduced himself as Louisa Moritz. And then a huge laugh. When they called me to go onstage, I was a zombie. He didn’t look at me while we were on the show. I didn’t look at him. I just felt him. I was afraid to tell anybody. I knew who Mr. Cosby was and that prevented me from telling anybody. I felt ashamed. I was embarrassed to be me.” Tap the photo to hear Louisa Moritz tell her story, and watch her video interview at nymag.com/cosby-women. A video posted by New York Magazine (@nymag) on

Joyce Emmons, 70:

Joyce Emmons, 70, was allegedly assaulted by Bill Cosby circa 1979. Emmons managed a comedy club and became friends with Cosby. They had known each other for about two-and-a-half years when Emmons and her friend went out to a club with Cosby and one of his friends. “I had a terrible headache, and I said, ‘Bill, do you have some Tylenol? I have a mother of a headache.’ And he said to me, ‘I have something stronger.’ And I said, ‘You know I don’t do drugs.’ He said, ‘You’re one of my best friends. Would I hurt you?’ And I believed him. All I remember is taking the pill; I don’t remember going to bed. But I do remember waking up in a fog and opening my eyes, and I had no clothes on, and there was Bill’s friend totally naked in bed with me. I said, ‘What the F did you give me?’ He said, ‘Oh, you had a bad headache, you were in so much pain. I gave you a quaalude.’ I was hurt with Bill more than angry at his friend. Bill let him take advantage of me. That kills me. That’s why I know the stories of what he did to the other women are true, because if he didn’t have the respect for me, who was really a close friend, then he could do that to anybody he didn’t know very well.” Tap the photo to hear Joyce Emmons tell her story, and watch her video interview at nymag.com/cosby-women.

A video posted by New York Magazine (@nymag) on

Cosby still denies any wrongdoing, despite the numerous accusations and mounting evidence against him, and has yet to be charged with any crime.

Incidentally, NY Magazine was hacked by someone who really hates New York and the site and story are no longer accessible (hopefully it will be back before long, however). And while the Cosby story went live last night (July 26, 2015), the subsequent hack on Monday morning was actually unrelated to the story’s release (“I have not even seen the cover, LOL,” the hacker ThreatKing said).

The Daily Dot reports ThreatKing “said his hatred of New York City is based on a visit to the city gone wrong. ‘I went to new York 2 months ago. It was really bad,’ ThreatKing said. ‘Someone pranked me. Everyone started laughing and shit. The first 10 hours being there. Some African-American tried to prank me with a fake hand gun.’ “

Thus, he “[wants] to see people die at [sic] New York.” “I’ve seen many pranks gone wrong at new york. That got me pissed. That’s why I chose New York.” “I’ll try my best to keep [New York] offline for 14 hours,” ThreatKing said, adding that “we would control the Internet if we had enough money. Because each server costs money.”

Wired depressingly notes, “Whether the alleged DDoS attacker knew it, by taking the story offline he is following in a grand tradition of keeping women’s stories from being heard—a tradition the story itself is trying to break.”

However, for the time being, a cached version of the article can be read here: