That Girl With the Eyebrows Doesn’t Know Who Robb Stark Is

UPDATE Sept. 16, 2015: Madden has since responded to Delevingne, writing on Twitter, “Hi @Caradelevingne, nothing but respect for you. Misquoted and blown out of proportion. #SlowNewsWeek”

Heated words are being exchanged between Cara Delevingne and Richard Madden.

Delevingne is dragging the former Game of Thrones actor after she found out that he had called her “unprofessional” during a recent interview.

Speaking with Yahoo! Lifestyle, Madden, most known for his role of Robb Stark on the HBO series, told the publication that he found the Paper Towns star’s behavior during her now-infamous awkward interview with Good Day Sacramento to be totally unacceptable.

At the time, Delevingne answered her questions sarcastically before the news anchors got fed up with her attitude and cut their chat short. Delevingne later explained that “some people just don’t understand sarcasm or the British sense of humor.”

“It was unprofessional. It made her seem ungrateful. She showed her age. For Cinderella, I did six weeks of those interviews, where you get asked the same eight questions,” the 29-year-old said of model-turned-actress. “If you’re not capable of doing that gracefully, then don’t do it.”

Taking to Twitter, Delevingne, 23, lashed out Madden, clapping back with what could be described as Hollywood’s version of “New phone. Who dis?” as a response. She wrote:

She also retweet a photo of herself giving someone the side-eye.

Despite being bashed by her fellow Brit, Delevingne can take comfort that she still has people on her side.

Soon after her cringe-worthy interview with the California morning show aired, Paper Towns author John Green wrote a lengthy essay defending Delevingne’s actions. He penned:

“I am friends with Cara, and the author of the book in question. I spent more than a month with her on tour in Europe and the U.S., and I watched as again and again, she was asked this question. Cara has read the book (multiple times), but the question is annoying — not least because her male costar, Nat Wolff, was almost always asked when he’d read the book, while Cara was almost always asked if she’d read it.”

“She refuses to indulge lazy questions and refuses to turn herself into an automaton to get through long days of junketry. I don’t find that behavior entitled or haughty. I find it admirable,” Green argued. “Cara Delevingne doesn’t exist to feed your narrative or your news feed — and that’s precisely why she’s so fucking interesting.”

Your move, Stark.