Taylor Swift Accused of Stealing Artwork to Promote ‘1989’

Taylor Swift Cares About Apple Music More Than She Cares About Struggling Photographers
It's a good day for people who want to throw money at Taylor Swift.

Taylor Swift just can’t seem to shake off claims that she’s benefitting off hardworking artists.

An United States artist by the name of Ally Burguieres is accusing the “Wildest Dreams” singer of stealing one of her artwork to promote 1989 over a year ago. In an open letter posted on Facebook, Burguieres claims Swift, 26, took a copy of a drawing she did and posted it onto Instagram along with lyrics to “I Know Places.”

“As a professional artist, I was astonished to see you use one of my most popular designs on all your official social media platforms as part of your promotions for 1989. While I wondered why no one had sought permission or offered compensation to do so, I recognized that such endorsement is a once-in-a-lifetime boost for an artist and can skyrocket an artist’s career,” she writes. “Friends congratulated me and customers expressed joy. But congratulations turned to confusion. The design was a copy, and with someone else’s name signed to it.”

“After months of effort, I received an offer from you and your team that mentions no credit to me as the artist of the design, but does include payment of a ‘four-figure’ amount, with the stipulation that I must donate it all,”Burguieres continues. “Taylor, as a professional, would you agree to such terms from Apple, or Spotify? My work is my living—it is how I pay bills and support my family and employees. Many of your fans are professional artists, and support themselves and their families with earnings from their intellectual property. Would you really profit from and distribute a copy of their work to millions of people, and then tell them they don’t deserve professional recognition or compensation?”

In another post, Burguieres alleges that Swift’s team told her the songstress isn’t interested in crediting the work “because—according to her team—her endorsement is too “valuable.'”

This is not the first time someone has accused Swift of profiting from the work of lesser-known artists. Soon after arguing Apple Music to give fair payment to independent musicians, Swift was accused of being a hypocrite for turning a blind eye to concert photographer who have been unfairly compensated for their work at her shows. Freelance photojournalist Jason Sheldon wrote an open letter to Swift in June, revealing that Swift’s team have been prohibiting photographers to license their concert photos to more than one publication and making them sign over the rights to any work produced in case Swift decides to use it to promote and further her own brand in the future.

Other photographers have also pointed out Swift’s constant lack of attribution when it comes to posting photos from the tour on her social media accounts, which are followed by millions of fans.