Everything You Need to Know About: ‘The Magnificent Seven’ 

Chris Pratt Is Taking an Acting Hiatus
After filming The Magnificent Seven, Passengers and Guardians of the Galaxy...

Yee-haw!

This weekend, Chris Pratt and a cast of all-stars are riding into theaters with The Magnificent Seven, a remake of a classic western. So, if you’re hankering for a rough-and-tumble adventure tonight, we have all the information you need!


Who’s in it?

Besides Pratt, the film stars Denzel Washington, Ethan Hawke, Vincent D’Onofrio, Lee Byung-hun, Peter Sarsgaard, Matt Bomer, Martin Sensmeier, Manuel Garcia-Rulfo and more.


What’s it about?

Just after the Civil War, the small town of Rose Creek is ruled by a ruthless industrialist named Bartholomew Bogue (Sarsgaard). In an attempt to free themselves of the cold-hearted businessman, the town calls upon seven outlaws to help them fight Bogue’s tyranny. Each of the seven possesses at least one unsavory skill the town requires. As the newly assembled team come to know the town, protecting the residents of Rose Creek becomes about far more than money.


Why should I care? 

First of all, it’s been a year since Chris Pratt has graced the big screen (we’re totally ignoring his cameo in Jem and the Holograms) and America needs some Pratt! Secondly, westerns are terrific because they know what they are: action and adventure, usually with some romance sprinkled in.

Here’s what critics are saying:

“If the sight of Denzel Washington, guns blazing and saddled up for his first western, doesn’t get your pulse racing, read elsewhere.”

-Peter Travers [Rolling Stone]


“It’s a lukewarm clone of a decent adaptation of a masterpiece. It’s as if the American film industry, having outlasted celluloid, now makes movies with tracing paper.”

-Colin Covert [Minneapolis Star Tribune]


“While there’s enjoyment to be had, there’s not a whit of surprise. You come to an Antoine Fuqua movie not to be taken somewhere new but to tour an old neighborhood with tough-guy professionalism.”

-Ty Burr [Boston Globe]


“There’s certainly enough verve, and love for the genre, to help one get past its trouble spots, but you can’t help feeling the mercenary thinking behind rehashing this mercenary yarn.”

-Robert Abele [The Wrap]